Read the two passages from “Everest Then and Now.” Passage 1 Since these early summits, over 4,500 ascents have been made to

Read the two passages from “Everest Then and Now.”

Passage 1
Since these early summits, over 4,500 ascents have been made to the top of Everest. Every year, more and more people flock the mountain, but not everyone goes there to climb. About 25,000 tourists visit the Everest area each year simply to experience the spectacular sights and culture. The increase in tourism and the number of climbers in recent decades has certainly ed the local economy. There are now schools, hospitals, and stores at the bottom of the mountain in Nepal. Everest has seen an explosion in popularity since the year 2000. The number of summit attempts has increased dramatically. This is partly because it’s easier than ever to travel to Everest. Modern transportation allows tourists and adventure seekers to fly into nearby cities. New technologies and better climbing equipment have also played a role. Improvements to climbing gear have made climbing Everest safer in many ways. However, climbing Everest still requires serious training and preparation.
Passage 2
The tourism industry surrounding Everest also impacts the environment. The biggest and most obvious impact is the amount of waste climbers leave behind. I have witnessed it firsthand. More and more waste is left each year. This includes empty oxygen and fuel tanks, abandoned tents, batteries, empty cans, and bottles. The government of Nepal requires each climber to bring about eight kilograms of waste back when they descend the mountain. They also make climbers pay some extra money before they start climbing. This money is only returned if climbers come back with the same amount of equipment they started with. When a climber returns with all of their gear, it means no waste was left on the mountain. In recent years, climbers and guides have removed more than 16 tons of litter from Everest. I have been a part of several expeditions that have climbed partway up the mountain just to clean it up. There are no estimates of how much waste remains on the mountain.
How is the structure of Passage 1 different from the structure of Passage 2?
Passage 1 uses a cause and effect structure, while Passage 2 uses a problem and solution structure.
Passage 1 uses a chronological order structure, while Passage 2 uses a cause and effect structure.
Passage 1 uses a compare and contrast structure, while Passage 2 uses a chronological order structure.
Passage 1 uses a problem and solution structure, while Passage 2 uses a compare and contrast structure.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *